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will in the future. his surprise showing in the election could make him a key player in coalition talks. flash floods in the andes, supply is contaminated. also in the program, aaron is here with the latest business news. looks like a shy and is coming off of apple? >> we are looking at a shift in the technology world. apple shares bit more than 30% in the last few months. the new iphone is stumbling. the question is this, are the best days of apple behind them? >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem, 12 noon in london, where david cameron has said it is time to give the british people a choice about membership in the european union. the prime minister pledged to hold a simple in or out referendum by the end of 2017. but the catch is he may not be prime mr. by then. and there are already plenty of voices in your saying that membership is not like a menu where you get to pick and choose. our political correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last david cameron delivered his big speech in europe. he began with what had gone wrong. not everyone, he said, wanted
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the government, it has not helped the islamists' cause. there's too much fear the country could once again descend into civil war. >> france is reporting some initial successes in mali where government troops had recaptured
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclear development. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. officials fr
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some push-back already. darrell issa said quote, i'm hoping the president will recognize that compromise should have been the words for today and they clearly weren't. john mccain said i would have liked to see a little more on outreach and working together. there was not, as i have seen in other inaugural speeches. i want to work with my colleagues. and i'm wondering what you think about this approach and i think that
magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned outright by other people. and on the markets of the day, those nearly four million human beings were worth something like $3 billion. that was an immense sum at the time. it was a sum greater than the value of all the farmland in all the states of the south. it was a sum fully three times as great as the cost of constructing all the railroads that then ran throughout all the united states. to give you some idea of just what those human bodies were worth. but even more important to southern wealth than the sale price of these human bodies was
banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "worldwide exchange." how are the markets looking? >> perfect. we'll check the markets in a second. i want to bring news out of the bank upon spain saying fourth quarter gdp was down 1.not -- 1.7% drop, it was .6 drop. pretty large. and 2012 gdp down 1.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news f
thought the rest of the u.s. >> the republican party who is elected to control the congress the same time as obama was elected are going to cross their arms and they are not going to raise the debt ceiling ultimately unless they get severe spending cuts and the obama administration is not going to give it to them. and you are going to watch the u.s. do crazy, crazy things this year. >> if you are right on those crazy, crazy things, then the rest of us are in for a dreadful, dread full time? >> dreadful. it is going to be so strange for the richest country on earth to cross their arms and say i'm not paying. imagine crossing your arms. you are going to see it this year. >> reporter: now, we have been asking our guests here for the riskometer. on this side we have is the u.s. a bigger threat to global growth in 2013. on this side the e.u. lutnic thinks the u.s. is by far the bigger. as you look overall most people still seem to believe europe is the biggest threat in 2013. by the way, speet tweet me wher think the biggest threat is. >> very official looking. did you make that yourself? >> d
legislative election. the second round was cancelled with the expectation they would have won a majority. a splinter group needed outside support. that's when it announced affiliation with al qaeda. it was a sign of their weakness that they needed to reach out to this global network. i think of them as actors that are thinking locally but acting globally. the extent to which they have resources may not reflect their actual support. i would not say this represents mass support on the part of ordinary algerian people. it is much more complex. they developed networks within southern algeria and some networks the torreg. >> the french have doubled the number of troops on the ground in mali. the defense minister of the country says there are 1400 soldiers trying to retake rebel- controlled towns. diabaly is 400 meters from the capital. french air strikes near diabaly have done little. chad has promised to send thousands of soldiers and hundreds of nigerian troops are expected to arrive. muhammed is in the capital with a report. what is the latest? >> elizabeth, we have been speaking with resi
in support for the secular brand that has been dominating had been -- headlines. the story of this election has not been so much about winners and losers as it has the power of the far right parties and which one netanyahu will take to be the next coalition government. >> in october netanyahu's foreign minister announced he would run on a single ballot. he looked likely to take a larger portion of seats in the new parliament, but in the last few weeks they have been losing support, mainly to this man. the 40-year-old millionaire encapsulates the emergence and acceptance of far right nationalism and israeli politics. bennet has run on a platform of restoring jewish values june politics as well as lowering cost of living. another man for the moment, the tv press center could become third in the elections and also be a coalition partner for netanyahu. rather than security issues, it is the economy that is dominating the of said -- the debate. netanyahu maybe on his way to another victory, but it is far from plain sailing. the parties are likely to be ideologically different. for netanyahu, win
. >> the results are respected soon from jordon's parliamentary election. jordon's parliament will have new powers, including the right to choose the next prime minister. tens of thousands of people -- is really hot political newcomer offers hopes that the coalition will succeed. -- the israeli political newcomer hopes the coalition will succeed. there will not be a "blocking majority" that will prevent them from forming a government. the pakistan community feels they're being unfairly punished for their beliefs following a graveyard attack. a man tied up a guard and 21 others before smashing more than 100 gravestones. >> the difference between the two halves of this one graveyard is plain to see. one side is neat and orderly, the other smashed to pieces. on december 3 at around one dozen men stormed the cemetery in the middle of the night. armed with guns, pickaxes, and sledgehammers, they set upon these graves, determined to destroy tombstones inscribed with koranic verse is. most are regarded as heretics because they believe there was a profit after muhammad. many frown on muslim prayers and ep
honorable friend he was in that referendum was very much part of his manifesto of the last election. [shouting] >> in the interest of harmony i think we'll leave that to one side. >> mr. speaker, a constituent of mine with a chronic medical condition tells me that he is just 20 pounds a week to spend on food and clothing after paying his utility bills, and after april after the welfare cuts in april, he will just have to pounds a day. if the prime minister police we're all in it together, with the agreed to review the impact on the very poorest of the welfare cuts so that my constituents sacrifices are in line with his own? >> i will look very close to what the honorable gentleman says and the circumstances. let me just make the point, if you compare 2013 with 2010 in terms of the level of key benefits, it is worth making this point. and unemployed person on jobseeker's allowance is getting 325 pounds more this year than in 2010. a couple jobseeker's allowance, 500 pounds more. a single out of work mother, 420 pounds more to do with the opposition try and do, week after week, is som
would hope they realize what i understood ebb when i first got elected in 1994. things like -- values like statesmanship and compromise and getting things done were values that people, you know, cherish. that doesn't mean we always got along, we had our battles. but i think the mayors are focused on results. the advise -- advice we would give them is you have a 12% approval rate. there is not much farther down you can go. the time is now to come together and tell a story about a congress that went from the do-nothing congress to a congress that is getting things done in the most pornt issues of our time. i think if they do, both parties will benefit and certainly, the nation will benefit. i say that as mon who needs to compromise on all of these issues. both parties need to understand that people are watching and they expect more from folks here on the beltway. >> when you compromise and you don't walk away with everything you wanted do you still feel like you are successful? >> all the time. you know -- i mean, i used to say they got elected too. the world was not made in my image. w
another term and how the election results for our closest ally in the middle east could affect the region. >> plus what it means for an impending showdown with iran. we'll go inent did and...what!!?? an article that says a typical family pays $155,000 in "wall street" fees on their 401(k)s? seriously? seriously. you don't believe it? search it, "401k 155k." then go to e-trade. and roll over your old 401(k)s to a new e-trade retirement account. we have every type of retirement account. none of them ch and all of them offer low cost investments. why? becae we're not your typical wall street firm, that's why. so you keep more of your money. e-trade. less for us. more for you. uma: fox news alert. firefighters on the scene of a three-alarm fire. that is in a three-store residence in lin, massachusetts. this is 10 miles north of downtown boston. firefighters are on the scene battling the blaze. we will have more details as we get them. jon: a brand new study links the use of aspirin to an increase risk of blindness. risk is live at the breaking news desk with that. rick? >> this is an importan
at the next election, there will be a general referendum on britain's future in the european union. he outlined the new relationships in europe. this is a little bit more than 40 minutes. >> i would like to thank limburg for hosting this this morning. this morning i would like to talk about the future of europe. but first let us remember the past. seven years ago, europe was being torn apart by a catastrophic conflict. the skies of london lit by flames night after night. millions dead across the world in the battle for peace and liberty. as we remember the sacrifice, so we should also remember how the shift in europe for more to sustain peace came about. it didn't happen like a change in the weather. it happened because of determined work over generations and a commitment to friendship and the resolve never to revisit that dark past. a commitment epitomized by the treaty found 50 years ago this week. after the berlin wall came down, i visited that city and i will never forget it. the abandoned checkpoints in the sense of excitement about the future. the knowledge that a great continent
the president for a moa. he's only the 16th president ever elected to two consecutive terms. we've heard a lot about second term curses that have brought down richard nixon, hampered ronald reagan, bill clinton. people forget reagan was able to get tax reform, bill clinton was able to get a balanced budget. certainly a big opportunity for the president but fully aware in the white house, a lot of challenges ahead as well, jenna. >> certainly not challenges for a father. nice to see the first family, ed, and how much the girls have grown up over the last four years. what we're looking at for the president tomorrow besides the hair styles and what everybody is wearing at the inauguration is what is he going to say? what will be the address to the nation tomorrow? you mentioned some policy challenges ahead. what are you hearing about tomorrow's address and how that might set the table, if you will, for the years to come? >> true. what i'm hearing is the state of the union address next month is really where the president will go with a deeper dive on policy, whether it be gun control, immigration
the conservatives will win the next election. [cheers and applause] >> and interestingly, an interest in not raising the fact the unemployment figures are down once again today. employment is up why 90,000 this quarter, and the rate of job growth last year was the fastest since 1989. but i answered his question very clearly. i want to see a strong britain in a reformed europe. we have a very clear plan. we want to reset the relationship. we will hold of that referendum that we were recommend that we settlement to the british people. the question now is for him. has he got a clue what he would do? >> ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, mr. speaker, he -- [shouting] the clues in the title prime minister's question, he is supposed to be answering the questions. [shouting] he has had six months, you said six months to think about this. it's not too much to ask. the right honorable member who is not your would say unequivocally that he would vote yes in a referendum. the children secretary who is hiding away down there, he has briefed he wants us to leave the european union. i am just asking the prime minister
the election results, but your money is doing well. and "varney & company" is about to begin. >> new funds in the tech world, it's not apple. you're used to long lines outside apple stores and people clamoring to get apple's latest version of the smart phone or tablet. the new buzz out there is samsung, not apple. apple-like hype is building for the samsung galaxy smart phone, a bigger screen, faster speed, longer lasting battery. and launched in may, it was considered the first to meet or exceed. you keep hearing, apple doesn't meet cool anymore, that's samsung. and i wonder if apple is below 500. where are we? >> and the traders are not getting in and out. right at the 498 mark, not far off from 500. i can tell you that ubs says the next 100 point move should be to the upside. you're right, it really hasn't been doing too much. stuart: and the s&p 500, they're at a five-year high and people down there are happy, aren't they. >> they are, right? they're back to the pre-the financial crisis and and then you sell, your overbought. stuart: cheer up, people, there's good news out there. the m
for election again, so the next four years, you got the sense that he was going to push for social change and you heard him use the word "together" at least seven times in his speech. he's going to be calling on americans for the next four years to be hammering it out with their local congressman and their local senators to try and push issues like gun reform immigration reform and for the first time, we heard a president use the term gay for gay marriage ever in an inaugural speech. so it was a different tone than four years ago. >> brandi hitt live for us. thank you, brandi. some folks said it seemed more like a state of the union address than it did an inaugural. he hit so many policies, whether it was climate change, the gay rights issue, equal pay for equal work, immigration reform. he referenced newtown, which obviously is the gun control battle going on. so he covered a wide range of things. he hit it hard, too. more of a progressive speech than a centrist speech. which some republicans are not going to like. >> you can do that on your second term. >>> later this half hour, we'll t
. it will be an in-out referendum. legislation will be drafted a for the next election. and if a conservative government is elected, we'll introduce the enabling legislation immediately and pacify the end of that year. and we will complete this negotiation and hold this referendum within the first half of the next parliament. it is time for the british people to have their say. it is time for us to settle this question about britain and europe. now, i say to the british people, this will be your decision. and when the choice comes, you will have an important choice to make about our country's desti destiny. now, i understand the appeal of going it alone, of charting our own course. but it will be a decision we will have to take with cool heads. proponents on both sides of the argument when he to avoid exaggerating their claims. of course britain could make her own way in the world, outside the eu, if we chose to do so. so could any other member state. but the question will have to ask ourselves is this, is that the very best future for our country? we will have to wait carefully where true na
americans who died in algeria. >>> "outfront" next elections in israel today. the voters send benjamin netanyahu a strong message. >>> and [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus presents the cold truth. i have the flu... i took theraflu, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] truth is theraflu doesn't treat your cough. . enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. [ male announcer ] end your long week... with a weekend getaway. save up to forty percent on all weekend hotel stays. book by january thirty first at hiltonanyweekend.com. >>> we are back with tonight's outer circle, where we reach out to our sources around the world. tonight, we go to israel, where voters turned out in huge numbers today to decide whether coalition led by benjamin netanyahu will continue to lead the country. a right wing coalition. the results were not as clear as expe
. >>> israelis are counting the votes in their parliamentary election. prime minister benjamin netanyahu has already claimed victory. but exit polls suggest he'll be governing with a weaker mandate. the polls indicate that a right-wing bloc led by netanyahu's likud party will remain the largest camp in parliament. but it lost ground to an alliance of center-left parties. >> translator: thank you for giving me the chance to lead israel for the third time. our biggest challenge remains preventing iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon. >> centrist party yesh atid is likely to become the second largest parliamentary force. the center-left labor party is projected to come third. the ultranationalist habayi habayit hayudi looks to secure its number of seats. the party opposes peace talks with palestinians. centrist parties have performed better than expected. some voters may have been worried by the country's tilt to the right. netanyahu is expected to begin negotiations with other parties to form a coalition. but it won't be easy. the gap between the two blocs will be narrow. >>> japanese research
minutes past the hour, i am patty and brown with your fox news minute. then yahoo! called early elections three months ago expecting and easy victory. the leader must now build a coalition after a strong showing by a new party. he is expected to keep his job. much of the u.s. experiencing the coldest temperature and two years. four deaths are blamed on the cold snap. entergy nuclear manually shut it down on monday. it was the second shut down this month and the six in the past two years. those are your headlines. back to melissa and lori. lori: many thanks. secretary of state hillary clinton defending the response and benghazi. >> we were misled that there were supposedly protest. that was easily -- >> the american people could have known that within days. >> with all due respect, the fact is we had four dead americans. what difference, at this point, does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and do everything we can to prevent it from ever happening again, senator. lori: secretary clinton will face members about the house in about 40 minutes. it is time for lou dobbs now. l
the break-room fridge. or through their. democratically elected representatives, enacts a gun control law of any kind. so we need to be ready. how are we gonna do that? >> it is time to get ready. start working out, start stretching. steerchg so important. you've got to stretch. trust me, when the (bleep) goes down, you do not want to pull a hammy. [cheers and applause] i recommend -- feel the like i'm in a road show of where the wild things are. i recommend hot yoga-- when you're mounting an armed insurrection, you want your chakras to be open. and your butt high and tight. [ laughter ] and you can't blame guys like yeager for being passionate because guns are the civil rights victims of our time. it's no coincidence that most of them are black. [ laughter ] and that i get nasty looks when i sit down with one at a lunch counter. [ laughter ] and i'm not the only one who thinks so. standing with me is larry ward founder of the first-ever gun appreciation day, which happens to be this saturday, the same weekend as martin luther king day. and that's no coincidence. >> i believe that gun app
to go forward. the chances of it going forward i think are small. he has to get re-elected in 2015 to propose the up or down vote in 2017. it does put a cloud over the u.k. and e.u. a bit. >> the u.s. view has been not to get involved in u.s. politics. the u.s. view is that -- involved in u.k. politics. the u.s. view that a strong u.k. and e.u. is good for the u.k., for europe and the united states. we'll let the brits sort out their politics internally. that overall view is one we've been thinking. >> this f they were to cede -- if they were to cede, what would that mean? >> i think it's not wise to speculate about what would happen if certain eventualities were occurring, were to occur. and as you say, it's too early to make predictions. >> let me ask you this -- i was at a dinner last night with a number of people you know well. our viewers know well. an off the record dinner. i will say the topic was does globalization still work. you know, this is a place that -- we're looking out where all you do is talk about globalization, people support globalization, what it means. is it
. that is one of the reasons he won re-election in difficulty fashion in 2010. now in 2014 other democratic senators in swing states who are up. jon: up for re-election. >> that's right. jon: if they cast a vote that is seen to be against the interests of firearms owners, hunters and the like, they could be in real trouble? >> guns and nra are both very popular in states like alaska and montana and arkansas and south dakota where there's a hunting culture, and, those senators like mark begich in alaska, will he actually vote for a gun ban? that i think is very problematic for the president. you're hearing some of these democrats, either noncommittal and saying i think this goes too far. jon: i was a little surprised when i heard about the executive actions the president was taking. it didn't seem to amount to, you know, large steps? >> no, i think that's right. they were pretty small things. a couple of things that might make a difference are on mental health, particularly easing privacy laws, rules, which make it difficult for somebody to speak about a young person's potential danger to an
saying. we've got essentially five years -- this is david cameron wins the next election before we hit the referendum, it will make businesses consider their investment opportunities. is that fair or not? >> i think the overlying reality is the uncertainty of our potential future in europe comes from the democratic position in the uk and that's regardless is a fact today. people are uncertain about what the shape of the club that we now belong to? and is it the same one that we joined? but i think the democratic deficit or this oh a sigz of people is the underlying issue. so doing something about that by saying, let's get clear the shape of the eu we do want. what is the shape of that? that has to be about the single market, about a more competitive europe. and that is something that i think they can take back and say that's a good thing for britain. and so i think you have to move towards it because the uncertainty is there today and those businesses will reflect that, anyway. i don't think illustrate necessarily changes. >> have you seen any changes in terms of the economic landscape
.s. house received 1.1 million more votes than republicans in the last election cycle. but republicans still won a 33- seat grigoriy and house. how? the report says -- it goes on to detail how republicans but millions of dollars in those states feeling state level victories that allowed republicans to spearhead redistricting for the 2012 election to their party's advantage. the group says it raised $30 million for the initiative. and the united nations is criticizing the u.s.-backed regime in saudi arabia for the beheading of a free lankan guest worker. -- be heading of a sri lanka guest worker. she was decapitated over allegations of murdering the baby of her employer. the spokesperson for the men high commissioner for human rights condemned the execution. >> we express our deep dismay at the execution of a young sri lanka and women on wednesday. -- a young woman on wednesday. she can to work as a house made in 2005, was charged for the murder of her employers' pay the a week after her arrival. despite a birth certificate that allegedly showed she was a minor at the time of the baby's death
minister. >> it will be a very simple choice of the next election but if you want to stay out of the single currency, you will conservative. if you want to join this ago giunta, you vote labour. if you want to take power back, you vote conservative if you want to give the power to brussels you vote labour. that is the truth. what we see from his position he wants absolutely no change in the relationship between britain and europe. he doesn't believe the british people should be given the choice. >> the prime minister is very rightly, rightly focus the government on growth and development of new housing. as well as providing much-needed new homes. in my constituency we have two developments, 8000 new homes coming forward. will the prime minister join me in praising the cost under 10 -- [inaudible] >> i'd be delighted to visit my honorable friend in rugby. is right to say we do need to build more houses in our country. that is because right now in much of help from your parents the average age of the first time buyer is now in their 30s. we need to build more homes to make sure we can allow p
employees whether we are elected officials or appointed or civil service employees have to hold ourselves to a higher standard and obviously this fellow hasn't done that. >> alisyn: arguing hey it was just laying around here. i needed power and he is just resourceful. >> well, that may be his argument. the fact is that doesn't hold muster with the public. this it fellow is being paid with public money and you just can't help yourself to public products. >> let's talk about that salary he was collecting $165,000 a year because did he this has now been cut in half to $83,000 a year. does that punishment sit well with you? is that good enough. >> i'm note sure. that's something for the mta to answer. certainly, they are going to look at this its swa. they have all of the facts. and he has to answer to his supervisors. we don't know what he has done. he apparently used other employees to do this as well. he loaded the generator with his employees into a public vehicle during work hours brought the generator to his home during work hours. you know. if you are him you have just had your salary
. it is time for another change. time to elect the senator who will protect our rights. >> some analysts believe the nra's power is waning as the number of house holds with guns has declined. barack obama was still reelected and many nra backed candidates did not win. but by all accounts the nra remains a well connected strong and shrewd political power that says it is currently gaining members and it is clearly stealing itself to match anything the white house throws its way. >> the nra is also influential among democrats. one of them happens to be harry reid. you know the man who the president would be reliant upon to get something significant through the senate -- >> 1994 and 2004 he has a b rating from the nra. that is higher than almost anyone. this amazing fact. he has received more money from the nra than any senate democrat. when it comes to harry reid and the nra it is a close relationship. >> kind of a love affair. he appeared with wayne lappier in 2010. he is a guy who says i am going to go with my party. so will he really oppose the president on gun issues? >> he is going to
. here is the real deal. part of the pragmatism is a look at the election. arkansas, louisiana, month tan na, north carolina, south dakota. it will be interesting to see whether the tide has turned. some polls show on some of the options, 89% of republicans support them. maybe that stat will put some courage in some of the politicians. >> thanks very much to john avlon >>> our third story out front. notre dame star linebacker says he is a victim of a bizarre hoax. he says he was conned by a woman into an internet relationship. that's the least bizarre part of this story. university held a late press conference tonight on the case. ted rollins is following the story. what more did university officials say to shed some light on what is a truly bizarre and disturbing story. >> this is such a shocking story to not only people in the sports world but because this story transcended the sports world. anyone that follows notre dame or who watched that championship game and heard about manti te'o and the death of his grandmother and his 22-year-old girlfriend who supposedly died of leukemia. we no
states's role in overthrowing the democratically elected leader in iran in the early 1950s is still hotly debated, the significance of that. that history is reviewed aerv o the scenes of a new movie that just iewened which is actually quite good. what do you think as you look of time, the lasting implications of u.s. policy deof >> iran is very complicated which we all understand. the ku of the prime minister was ousted if that is the word in 53 and the shop was never out of office but was reinstalled and put back in power. it was originally thought of by the british because it turned all the avy into oil. but i do think the present situation, you can understand or one should understand little bit that the iranian country has been overrun all its life by alexander, it has been told what to do by the greeks, the russians, united states, the british, they want to have a place at the table and they would like to have a say in their own lives. they live in a community surrounded by arabs. they have never gotten along despite the fact they're all muslims, the iranians don't like the muslims --
term pain and i don't think our elected officials want to be responsible for taking the very hard actions that need to be done. i think the american people know that it needs to be done. >> kelly: okay, and talking about hard options, specifically, what are the hard options? because we know we spend entirely too much money as a government. we spend it on domestic programs, so, give me some examples of what those hard options are and where to make the cuts so we can sustain our economy and channel some growth instead of going the opposite direction. >> well, i think it's just like any other budget that's out of whack. you first start where is the biggest potential area of savings? i would look at health care, i would look at the fact that in america, we spend one out of every $6 on health care. i think the government, you know, and this is not just me, you know, the congressional budget office, cbo-- >> when you're talking about health care, you're talking about medicaid, medicare, what other-- >> i'm talking about, a lot of the aspects, i think, that not only medicare and medicaid
, you know, when it comes to this debt ceiling issue, or it comes to who's going to be elected, or health care issues or what have you. how is that -- how do you put that in to your investing hat? >> well, everything is a transaction, and it won't have an effect on prices, in any event, unless it has an effect on a transaction. so what i do is i know who the buyers and the sellers are. and then by thinking that through, i think how will it have an effect on transactions. far more important than, over the long term, the leader of a country will have some effect on the whole overall health of the economy. but even -- they can't even res. they're, you know, it's a very difficult challenge. the whole political system. you could be president of the united states and it doesn't mean you can change policy. then, if policy changes, it has to basically change the things that produce -- have an effect on productivity. it's something that's peripheral largely. like, for example, a bigger issue is how does financial transactions work such as if you lower interest rate, and you have nothing
million for the 2014 midterm elections. the n.r.a. is obviously, as you mentioned, going to be adding to their membership, getting more fund raising so this is a battle and a place where they can take out intense positions. >> sreenivasan: how about putting this in terms of perspective in terms of 2014, 2016? even the vice president why he decided to come out on good deal but is on almost a road tour. he seems to be campaigning for both gun rights and gun control or sun safety as well as maybe for himself. >> well, the presidential race, of course, we just inaugurated president obama for his second term. we've seen action shifts to the states. you have democratic governors making moves on this. andrew cuomo in new york is taking the lead. he could run for president. the vice president is not making it secret that he could be running for president as well so he's the front man on this major issue that the president will be talking about. so none of this is without politics in mind. the money does matter, the momentum on this matters when you're talking to different families affected by
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